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  • Writer's pictureRobin Alex Panicker

Quick Start Guide on Animations in Jetpack Compose


Quick Start Guide on Animations in Jetpack Compose

Jetpack Compose is a modern UI toolkit for building native Android apps with a declarative approach. It simplifies the process of creating user interfaces and provides a seamless way to incorporate animations into your apps.


In this blog post, we will explore the powerful animation capabilities offered by Jetpack Compose and demonstrate how to build engaging animations for your Android applications.


Let's dive in!


Prerequisites


Before we begin, make sure you have the latest version of Android Studio installed, along with the necessary dependencies for Jetpack Compose. Additionally, some basic knowledge of Jetpack Compose and Kotlin programming is recommended.


Setting up Jetpack Compose project


To get started, create a new Jetpack Compose project in Android Studio. Once the project is set up, you can start building animations by leveraging the built-in animation APIs provided by Jetpack Compose.


Animating Properties


One of the fundamental concepts in building animations with Jetpack Compose is animating properties. Compose offers a dedicated animate* function family that allows you to animate various properties, such as alpha, size, position, and more.


Here's an example of animating the alpha property of a Compose UI element:

@Composable
fun AnimatedAlphaDemo() {
    var isVisible by remember { mutableStateOf(true) }
    val alpha by animateFloatAsState(if (isVisible) 1f else 0f)

    Box(
        modifier = Modifier
            .size(200.dp)
            .background(Color.Blue.copy(alpha = alpha))
    ) {
        Button(
            onClick = { isVisible = !isVisible },
            modifier = Modifier.align(Alignment.Center)
        ) {
            Text(text = if (isVisible) "Hide" else "Show")
        }
    }
}

In this example, we use the animateFloatAsState function to animate the alpha value of the background color based on the isVisible state. When the button is clicked, the isVisible state toggles, triggering the animation.


Transition Animations


Jetpack Compose provides a powerful Transition API that simplifies the process of creating complex animations. It allows you to define a transition between two states and automatically animates the changes.


Let's take a look at an example of a transition animation using Jetpack Compose:

@Composable
fun TransitionAnimationDemo() {
    var expanded by remember { mutableStateOf(false) }

    val transition = updateTransition(targetState = expanded, label = "ExpandTransition")
    val size by transition.animateDp(label = "Size") { state ->
        if (state) 200.dp else 100.dp
    }
    val color by transition.animateColor(label = "BackgroundColor") { state ->
        if (state) Color.Green else Color.Red
    }

    Box(
        modifier = Modifier
            .size(size)
            .background(color)
            .clickable { expanded = !expanded }
    )
}

In this example, we use the updateTransition function to define a transition animation. We animate the size and background color properties based on the expanded state. When the box is clicked, the expanded state toggles, triggering the transition animation.


Complex Animations with AnimatedVisibility


AnimatedVisibility is a powerful composable that allows you to animate the visibility of UI elements. It provides fine-grained control over enter, exit, and change animations.


Here's an example of using AnimatedVisibility to create a fade-in and fade-out animation:

@Composable
fun FadeAnimationDemo() {
    var isVisible by remember { mutableStateOf(true) }

    Column {
        Button(
            onClick = { isVisible = !isVisible },
            modifier = Modifier.padding(16.dp)
        ) {
            Text(text = if (isVisible) "Hide" else "Show")
        }

        AnimatedVisibility(
            visible = isVisible,
            enter = fadeIn() + slideInVertically(),
            exit = fadeOut() + slideOutVertically()
        ) {
            Box(
                modifier = Modifier
                    .size(200.dp)
                    .background(Color.Blue)
            )
        }
    }
}

In this example, the AnimatedVisibility composable wraps a Box that represents the UI element we want to animate. We specify the enter and exit animations as a combination of fade-in, fade-out, slide-in, and slide-out effects.


Conclusion


Jetpack Compose provides a powerful set of animation APIs that make it easy to create engaging and interactive UIs for your Android apps. In this blog post, we explored animating properties, creating transition animations, and using the AnimatedVisibility composable. By leveraging these capabilities, you can build stunning animations that enhance the user experience of your applications.


Remember to check out the official Jetpack Compose documentation for more details and additional animation options.


Happy coding!

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